Fishing report - July 11

Story by Utah Division of Wildlife Resources
July 11, 2012
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Bear Lake

For updates on fishing conditions, contact the recorded information line after 5 p.m. at 435–946-8501. The local fishing ponds in Bear Lake Valley (Garden City and Lakeview) also provide great family fishing opportunities.

Birch Creek Reservoir

Birch Creek is a great place to escape the crowds. Try baits, streamers and spinners for tiger and rainbow trout.

Blacksmith Fork River

Fishing has been good. One angler reported that this is the best season he’s seen in 20 years. Hoppers are starting to come out — use a #14 stimulator with a light green body. Be aware of rattlesnakes in the area.

Bountiful Lake

Volunteer Tyler Scott reports that the fishing is slow. Most anglers are fishing from the shore. Try using a worm for trout and garlic-flavored PowerBait for catfish. Some anglers are using spinners, jigs and cheese with no success. The water is murky and warm.

Causey Reservoir

Volunteer Darryl LaRocque reports that there are a lot of swimmers and kayakers on the lake. Fishing is slow, but a few smaller rainbows and tigers are being caught from the shore. Try fishing on the north end of the lake by the Boy Scout Camp. Use pink PowerBait on the rainbows and worms on the tigers.

Cutler Reservoir & Marsh

The fishing continues to be fair for crappie, walleye, catfish and bluegill.

East Canyon Reservoir & State Park

Volunteer Daryl LaRocque reports that the weather is a little windy at times, but anglers are having success for good-sized rainbows in the 14- to 18-inch range. Try drifting pop gear with worms and PowerBait down about 15 feet, right out in the middle, and down by the south end. Fishing from shore with plastic bubbles and PowerBait is producing some smaller rainbows. Smallmouth are biting in the evening, back in the shallow bays with soft plastics and spinner baits. Park Ranger Jeff Dale reports that fishing is the best in the early morning hours. This week, Rapalas have been slow and floating PowerBait has worked best.

Echo Reservoir

Volunteer Mark Greenamyer reports that anglers are having fair success fishing for rainbows from the shore using PowerBait. The wind has been high, knocking the fish to lower depths.

Farmington Pond

Volunteer Tyler Scott reports that the fishing is pretty slow. There are a lot of other activities going on at the lake, including swimming. One catfish was caught recently — the angler was next to the dock and used a worm. Most anglers are using worms and PowerBait.

Holmes Creek Reservoir

Warmer weather and private waterskiing have slowed the fishing, especially for trout.

Hyrum Reservoir & State Park

Volunteer Mark Greenamyer reports that bass anglers are having good results using black and blue jigs near submerged vegetation. You can also try frogs in the grassy areas. For more information visit http://stateparks.utah.gov/stateparks.utah.gov/hyrum/fishingclassic or call the park at 435-245-6866.

Jensen Nature Park Pond

Volunteer Tyler Scott reports that fishing is good using PowerBait and worms. Anglers are catching trout on worms and PowerBait. The average fish size is 10 inches. Anglers are having the most success right before dark from shore.

Kaysville Ponds

Volunteer Tyler Scott reports that the fishing is good for bluegill. One angler recently caught two catfish on shrimp. Anglers are also catching bluegill on worms. There are no other species of fish being caught. The water has been very clear.

Little Creek Reservoir

Summer drawdowns of water in the reservoir have started. Try fishing with bait or snail imitations.

Logan River

Check the DWR stocking report for the latest stocking information.

Lost Creek Reservoir

Make sure you are aware of the new regulations at Lost Creek: There is a total trout limit of four fish. You are allowed to keep three trout under 15 inches and one trout over 22 inches. All fish, including rainbows, from 15 to 22 inches must be immediately released.

Mantua Reservoir

Anglers are still catching bluegill in good numbers. Early morning and before sundown are productive times to fish, but it can be windy. Try using a small piece of nightcrawler on a snelled hook under a bobber.

Mirror Lake

The list of lakes that will now permanently receive tiger trout include Butterfly, Lilly, Mirror, Moosehorn, Pass, Teapot, Trial and Washington. Roadside lakes are being stocked weekly with both rainbows and tiger trout. Try using PowerBait or worms. Fly anglers should use small size 16 or 18 Renegade, Parachute Adams or black ants. Be sure to take advantage of the bonus brook trout limit — especially in streams throughout the Uintas.

Newton Reservoir

Some anglers have had success for tiger muskies using small pieces of chicken or carp meat. Catch and release is required for all tiger muskies at Newton.

Ogden River

Volunteer Darryl LaRocque reports that flows are high but clear. Anglers are having success with both dry and wet flies. Try Parachute Adams for the dry flies, and Copper John’s and Beaded Prince on the wet flies. The area just below The Oaks is good in the evening with the dry flies.

Pineview Reservoir

Volunteer Darryl LaRocque reports that there are a lot of swimmers, water skiers and wave runners on the lake. If you want to catch a lot of big carp and bullheads for the kids, try the shallows on the east end. The smallmouth fishing should pick up after the weekend. One angler said he caught a 14-pound carp using nightcrawlers. Conservation Officer Chad Wilson reports that anglers are having some consistent success catching perch, bass and catfish.

Porcupine Reservoir

Fishing pressure is currently light at Porcupine. Anglers are catching a few smaller browns. On the East Fork Little Bear River, you may only use artificial flies and lures.

Rockport Reservoir

Joseph Hamby reports that the fishing is good at Rockport. The boaters have done well with a variety of lures and baits. The trout seem to be 12 to 20 feet down. There have been good reports from the shore fishermen as well. The smallmouth bass are just now coming on. All the large docks are in. The water temperature is around 66 degrees. We are still in the process of replacing the fish-cleaning station with the new grinder type. We should have it in soon.

Weber River

Biologist Paul Thompson reports that the Weber River continues to fish very well with standard nymphs (hare’s ears, prince nymphs, pheasant tails, scuds/sow bugs, and midges). With the warm weather, fishing is the best in the morning or late evening. If you feel adventurous, try streamers (sculpin patterns, and brown or black buggers) after dark when some of the larger browns are more active. Spinners and crankbaits have also been working well. Check flow releases from Rockport and Echo reservoirs at USGS gaging stations prior to fishing.

Willard Bay Reservoir

Volunteer Darryl LaRocque reports that conditions at the reservoir are very windy at times. Bottom bouncing and lead core line have produced a few walleyes on the high spot just east of freeway bay, as well as at the light pole on the east end. Small black/silver and black/gold Rapalas work well. One angler said he saw wipers boiling on shad in the evening, but it didn’t last long. Right now there are a lot of recreation boaters on the lake. Wiper fishing has been very slow.

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OGDEN NATURE CENTER

The Ogden Nature Center is located at 966 W. 12th St. in Ogden. For more information, visit www.ogdennaturecenter.org or call 801-621-7595.

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